Saturday, February 14, 2015

Condition Inspection



§91.327 Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating limitations

(b) No person may operate an aircraft that has a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category unless—

(2) A condition inspection is performed once every 12 calendar months by a certificated repairman (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an appropriately rated repair station in accordance with inspection procedures developed by the aircraft manufacturer or a person acceptable to the FAA;
(c) No person may operate an aircraft issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category to tow a glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle for compensation or hire or conduct flight training for compensation or hire in an aircraft which that persons provides unless within the preceding 100 hours of time in service the aircraft has—
(1) Been inspected by a certificated repairman with a light-sport aircraft maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an appropriately rated repair station in accordance with inspection procedures developed by the aircraft manufacturer or a person acceptable to the FAA and been approved for return to service in accordance with part 43 of this chapter; or
(2) Received an inspection for the issuance of an airworthiness certificate in accordance with part 21 of this chapter.


So, an SLSA gets a condition inspection, and a standard category gets an annual inspection. The FAA does not use the term "annual inspection," and makes no distinction between the procedures for an annual or a 100 hour inspection. The FARs say that all aircraft must have had a "condition inspection within the preceding 12 calendar months", and those in commercial service must have a condition inspection within the previous 100 hours of operation. Sally is being used in "commercial service" (IE flight school operations), so needs the 100 hour inspection.


I decided to have the inspection done while I was away attending the Expo in Sebring. Saturday morning before my trip I pulled Sally out of her hangar at Quakertown and made the short flight over to Butter Valley. Harry had left tie down ropes and chocks on the asphalt pad in front of his workshop. It was so cold. The chocks were frozen to the ground. I had to break them loose by kicking them with the heal of my shoe. I opened the wing locker and removed the canopy cover. I hadn't used it in awhile so it took time to position it properly. It was so cold. Finally Kathy arrived to pick me up. We sat in the car for a few minutes to warm up before checking Sally one last time. She was secure. I left this note for Harry:
The airplane has been flying well. Take off power reaches just over 4900RPM (my min is 4850). All temps and pressures are solid “green”. Except for discrepancies listed below, I’m very happy with her performance.

1. 100 hour Condition Inspection – needs breaks.

2. Oil Change (oil and filter provided) Note the new drain valve.

3. Oil Leak. Left side…nothing new. Doesn’t appear to be getting worse. Bugs the heck out of me. Fix it if you can.

4. Coolant leak. Just started to notice fluid on nose wheel pant after a flight. I have not added any coolant in the past 100 hours.

5. Nose wheel pant: scraped up pretty much after my landing with flat tire. I’ve decided not to modify the other pants. Do your magic on this.

6. Canopy struts: Replace. The old fittings can be used on the new struts provided.

7. Left flap: Student stepped on it. Cosmetic dent. Pull it out if you can.

Then we left and I focused my attention on my trip to Sebring.

On Monday I called from sunny Florida. Pennsylvania was having an ice storm, Harry was unable to get started because of the bad weather. I checked back on Wednesday and operations were well underway. Sally was in is workshop, her pieces being carefully inspected. She did need brakes.

When I stopped by to check on progress Harry was still waiting on the delivery of brake parts. He showed me the progress he had made with the rest of the items on my list.  The important items had been completed, but it would take a few more days before we could escape from Butter Valley.

Reference: Finding a Czech Mate for Flying Adventures ,
Certified Czech



1 comment:

  1. As I always tell myself , you learn something "new" everyday...!!! Condition inspection and annual inspection (one in the same) all depends on the aircraft category .

    ReplyDelete